Doctors used to use your fasting morning blood sugar level as a guide to managing diabetes. Now they depend far more on a test called Hemoglobin A1C, or HBA1C.
Eating raises blood sugar levels. If your blood sugar rises too high, sugar sticks to the surface of cells where it cannot be removed. The sugar is converted to a poison called sorbitol that damages the cell to cause heart attacks, kidney damage, blindness and other nerve damage.

Your fasting morning blood sugar level doesn’t tell you if you are getting cell damage, but the Hemoglobin A1C test actually measures how much sugar sticks to cells. Once you start treatment, your doctor should check you once a month to measure your HBA1C. If it is high, you should change your diet and or your doctor should change your medication. When the HBA1C is normal, you are doing everything right. See Report #D222.

HWM Breuer. The postprandial blood glucose level – A new target for optimizing treatment of diabetes mellitus. European Heart Journal Supplements, 2000, Vol 2, Iss D, pp D36-D38.

Checked 8/8/05